Washington State Standards and C3 Connections

This list shows Washington State Grade Level Expectations (GLE) and Washington State Learning Standards (LS) with the correlating connections to the four dimensions of the C3 Framework for Social Studies State Standards (D1, D2, D3, and D4, respectively) for each standard listed. Thanks to Steve Perez, teacher at Hanford High School in Washington for his work on this list.

Lesson 1: A Different Kind of Government Course introduces students to CAP. First, Students learn that one of the main purposes of public education is to prepare future citizens to participate in our democracy. Then they are given an overview of CAP. Finally, they brainstorm the attributes of an effective citizen.

GLE Component 1.1: Understands key ideals and principles of the United States, including those in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other fundamental documents.

LS 1.1.1 Analyzes and evaluates the ways in which state and U.S. Constitutions and other fundamental documents promote key ideals and principles

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level.

D2.Civ.2.9-12. Analyze the role of citizens in the U.S. po­litical system, with attention to various theories of democ­racy, changes in Americans’ participation over time, and alternative models from other countries, past and present.  



Lesson 2: Introduction to Public Policy introduces the link between policy and problems. First, students read and discuss a short article defining policy. Then they discuss policy and its connection to problems. Next, in small groups, they do a newspaper search to find examples of public policy.

GLE Component 5.3: Deliberates public issues.

LS 5.3.1 Creates and articulates possible alternative resolutions to public issues and evaluates these resolutions using criteria that have been identified in the context of a discussion.

D3.1.9-12. Gather relevant information from multiple sources representing a wide range of views while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection.



Lesson 3: Problems, Policy, and Civic Actions gives students further background in problems, policy and civic action to prepare them for CAP. First, students analyze problems in terms of causes and effects. Next, they explore how policy can be linked to problems. Finally, they list possible civic actions that can be taken to when working on a problem.

GLE Component 1.2: Understands the purposes, organization, and function of governments, laws, and political systems.

LS 1.2.4 Understands and evaluates how political systems in the United States operate.

D2.Civ.1.9-12. Distinguish the powers and responsibili­ties of local, state, tribal, na­tional, and international civic and political institutions

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement.

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level.

GLE Component 4.4: Uses history to understand the present and plan for the future.

LS 4.4.1 Analyzes how an understanding of United States history can help us prevent problems today.

D2.Civ.12.9-12. Analyze how people use and challenge local, state, national, and international laws to address a variety of public issues.

D2.Civ.13.9-12. Evaluate public policies in terms of intended and unintended outcomes, and related consequences.

D2.Civ.14.9-12. Analyze historical, contemporary, and emerging means of chang­ing societies, promoting the common good, and protect­ing rights.



Lesson 4: Introducing Policy Analysis helps students develop a deeper understanding of public policy and the interaction between government and citizens in making policy. They look at case studies and are introduced to policy analysis. Analyze a public policy in terms of its goals and who might support it

GLE Component 1.2: Understands the purposes, organization, and function of governments, laws, and political systems.

LS 1.2.4 Understands and evaluates how political systems in the United States operate.

D2.Civ.1.9-12. Distinguish the powers and responsibili­ties of local, state, tribal, na­tional, and international civic and political institutions.

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level.

D2.Civ.2.9-12. Analyze the role of citizens in the U.S. po­litical system, with attention to various theories of democ­racy, changes in Americans’ participation over time, and alternative models from other countries, past and present.

GLE Component 4.3: Understands that there are multiple perspectives and interpretations of historical events.

LS 4.3.1 Analyzes differing interpretations of events in U.S. history (1890—present).

D4.6.9-12. Use disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses to understand the character­istics and causes of local, re­gional, and global problems; instances of such problems in multiple contexts; and challenges and opportuni­ties faced by those trying to address these problems over time and place.

GLE Component 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

LS 5.2.1 Evaluates and revises research questions to refine inquiry on an issue or event.

LS 5.2.2 Evaluates the validity, reliability, and credibility of sources when researching an issue or event.

D1.2.9-12. Explain points of agreement and disagreement experts have about inter­pretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a com­pelling question.

D1.4.9-12. Explain how supporting questions contribute to an inquiry and how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.



Lesson 5: Policymaking in the Three Branches of Government introduces students to executive, legislative and judicial policymaking and to policy evaluation. First, students discuss how policy can be made by each of the branches. Then they read about and discuss how the Chicago City Council passed an ordinance to suppress gang activity and how each branch of government was involved in the policy. Finally, students are introduced to a policy-analysis rubric (GRADE) and apply it to the Chicago gang ordinance.

GLE Component 1.2: Understands the purposes, organization, and function of governments, laws, and political systems.

LS 1.2.2 Evaluates the effectiveness of federalism in promoting the common good and protecting individual rights, and the system of checks and balances during a particular administration, court, Congress, or legislature.

LS 1.2.3 Analyzes and evaluates the structures of state, tribal, and federal forms of governments by comparing them to those of other governments.

D2.Civ.1.9-12. Distinguish the powers and responsibili­ties of local, state, tribal, na­tional, and international civic and political institutions.

GLE Component 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

LS 5.2.1 Evaluates and revises research questions to refine inquiry on an issue or event.

D1.2.9-12. Explain points of agreement and disagreement experts have about inter­pretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a com­pelling question.

D1.4.9-12. Explain how supporting questions con- tribute to an inquiry and how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.

D1.5.9-12. Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.

Lesson 6: Analyzing Anti-Gang Policy provides students with practice in analyzing policy. First, as a whole group, they evaluate an anti-gang policy using GRADE. Then in small groups, they are given policies that address gang violence and they evaluate each.

GLE Component 4.3: Understands that there are multiple perspectives and interpretations of historical events.

LS 4.3.2 Analyzes multiple causes of events in U.S. history, distinguishing between proximate and long-term causal factors (1890—present).

D2.His.1.9-12. Evaluate how historical events and devel­opments were shaped by unique circumstances of time and place as well as broader historical contexts.

D2.His.2.9-12. Analyze change and continuity in historical eras.

D2.His.3.9-12. Use ques­tions generated about indi­viduals and groups to assess how the significance of their actions changes over time and is shaped by the historical context.

GLE Component 5.1: Uses critical reasoning skills to analyze and evaluate positions.

LS 5.1.1 Analyzes the underlying assumptions of positions on an issue or event.

LS 5.1.2 Evaluates the depth of a position on an issue or event.

D4.6.9-12. Use disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses to understand the character­istics and causes of local, re­gional, and global problems; instances of such problems in multiple contexts; and challenges and opportuni­ties faced by those trying to address these problems over time and place.

D4.7.9-12. Assess options for individual and collective action to address local, regional, and global problems by engaging in self-reflection, strategy identification, and complex causal reasoning.

GLE Component 5.3: Deliberates public issues.

LS 5.3.1 Creates and articulates possible alternative resolutions to public issues and evaluates these resolutions using criteria that have been identified in the context of a discussion.

D3.1.9-12. Gather relevant information from multiple sources representing a wide range of views while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection.

D3.2.9-12. Evaluate the credibility of a source by examining how experts value the source.

D3.3.9-12. Identify evidence that draws information di­rectly and substantively from multiple sources to detect inconsistencies in evidence in order to revise or strengthen claims.

D3.4.9-12. Refine claims and counterclaims attending to precision, significance, and knowledge conveyed through the claim while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both.



Lesson 7: Policymaking at the Local Level gets students to examine an instance of policymaking at a school board, one of the most common institutions at the local level. First, students read about and discuss a common local (and national) problem, the dropout rate. Then they role play subcommittees of a hypothetical school board, examine documents about the dropout problem, and craft a policy to address the dropout problem. Finally, they exchange policies with other groups and evaluate one another’s policies using the GRADE rubric.

GLE Component 1.2: Understands the purposes, organization, and function of governments, laws, and political systems.

LS 1.2.4 Understands and evaluates how political systems in the United States operate.

D2.Civ.1.9-12. Distinguish the powers and responsibili­ties of local, state, tribal, na­tional, and international civic and political institutions.

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level.

D2.Civ.2.9-12. Analyze the role of citizens in the U.S. po­litical system, with attention to various theories of democ­racy, changes in Americans’ participation over time, and alternative models from other countries, past and present.

GLE Component 4.3: Understands that there are multiple perspectives and interpretations of historical events.

LS 4.3.2 Analyzes multiple causes of events in U.S. history, distinguishing between proximate and long-term causal factors (1890—present).

D2.His.1.9-12. Evaluate how historical events and devel­opments were shaped by unique circumstances of time and place as well as broader historical contexts.

D2.His.2.9-12. Analyze change and continuity in historical eras.

D2.His.3.9-12. Use ques­tions generated about indi­viduals and groups to assess how the significance of their actions changes over time and is shaped by the historical context.

GLE Component 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

LS 5.2.1 Evaluates and revises research questions to refine inquiry on an issue or event.

D1.2.9-12. Explain points of agreement and disagreement experts have about inter­pretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a com­pelling question.

D1.4.9-12. Explain how supporting questions contribute to an inquiry and how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.

D1.5.9-12. Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.

GLE Component 5.3: Deliberates public issues.

LS 5.3.1 Creates and articulates possible alternative resolutions to public issues and evaluates these resolutions using criteria that have been identified in the context of a discussion.

D3.1.9-12. Gather relevant information from multiple sources representing a wide range of views while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection.

GLE Component 5.4: Creates a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.

LS 5.4.1 Evaluates and interprets other points of view on an issue within a paper or presentation.

D4.1.9-12. Construct arguments using precise and knowledgeable claims, with evidence from multiple sources, while acknowledging counterclaims and evidentiary weaknesses.

D4.2.9-12. Construct expla­nations using sound reason­ing, correct sequence (linear or non-linear), examples, and details with significant and pertinent information and data, while acknowledging the strengths and weaknesses of the explanation given its purpose (e.g., cause and ef­fect, chronological, procedur­al, technical).

D4.3.9-12. Present adapta­tions of arguments and expla­nations that feature evocative ideas and perspectives on issues and topics to reach a range of audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technol­ogies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).



Lesson 8: Law and Policy informs students about how existing law can influence public policy and policymaking. Frist, students read about and discuss how existing law can influence public policy. Then in small groups, they role play members of a public policy law firm and decide whether a policy of evicting renters violates existing law and whether a new law is needed to protect renters.

GLE Component 1.2: Understands the purposes, organization, and function of governments, laws, and political systems.

LS 1.2.4 Understands and evaluates how political systems in the United States operate.

D2.Civ.1.9-12. Distinguish the powers and responsibili­ties of local, state, tribal, na­tional, and international civic and political institutions.

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level.

D2.Civ.2.9-12. Analyze the role of citizens in the U.S. po­litical system, with attention to various theories of democ­racy, changes in Americans’ participation over time, and alternative models from other countries, past and present.

GLE Component 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

LS 5.2.1 Evaluates and revises research questions to refine inquiry on an issue or event.

D1.2.9-12. Explain points of agreement and disagreement experts have about inter­pretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a com­pelling question.

D1.4.9-12. Explain how supporting questions con- tribute to an inquiry and how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.

D1.5.9-12. Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.

GLE Component 5.3: Deliberates public issues.

LS 5.3.1 Creates and articulates possible alternative resolutions to public issues and evaluates these resolutions using criteria that have been identified in the context of a discussion.

D3.1.9-12. Gather relevant information from multiple sources representing a wide range of views while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection.



Lesson 9: Persuading introduces students to the art of persuasion. First, they read about and discuss the three types of persuasion: logos, ethos, and pathos. Then students prepare two-minute persuasive talks on why the issue that they have chosen to address in CAP in important. Finally, in pairs, students present and critique one another’s talks.

GLE Component 4.4: Uses history to understand the present and plan for the future.

LS 4.4.1 Analyzes how an understanding of United States history can help us prevent problems today.

D2.Civ.12.9-12. Analyze how people use and challenge local, state, national, and international laws to address a variety of public issues.

D2.Civ.13.9-12. Evaluate public policies in terms of intended and unintended outcomes, and related consequences.

D2.Civ.14.9-12. Analyze historical, contemporary, and emerging means of chang­ing societies, promoting the common good, and protect­ing rights.

GLE Component 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

LS 5.2.1 Evaluates and revises research questions to refine inquiry on an issue or event.

D1.2.9-12. Explain points of agreement and disagreement experts have about inter­pretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a com­pelling question.

D1.4.9-12. Explain how supporting questions con- tribute to an inquiry and how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.

D1.5.9-12. Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.

GLE Component 5.3: Deliberates public issues.

LS 5.3.1 Creates and articulates possible alternative resolutions to public issues and evaluates these resolutions using criteria that have been identified in the context of a discussion.

D3.1.9-12. Gather relevant information from multiple sources representing a wide range of views while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection.

GLE Component 5.4: Creates a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.

LS 5.4.1 Evaluates and interprets other points of view on an issue within a paper or presentation.

D4.1.9-12. Construct arguments using precise and knowledgeable claims, with evidence from multiple sources, while acknowledging counterclaims and evidentiary weaknesses.

D4.2.9-12. Construct expla­nations using sound reason­ing, correct sequence (linear or non-linear), examples, and details with significant and pertinent information and data, while acknowledging the strengths and weaknesses of the explanation given its purpose (e.g., cause and ef­fect, chronological, procedur­al, technical).

D4.3.9-12. Present adapta­tions of arguments and expla­nations that feature evocative ideas and perspectives on issues and topics to reach a range of audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technol­ogies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).



Lesson 10: Building Constituencies introduces students to the importance of building a constituency to support or oppose public policies. First, students read and discuss about how a historically significant movement gained support in the community. Then in small groups, students brainstorm how they can get support for their CAP issue.

GLE Component 1.2: Understands the purposes, organization, and function of governments, laws, and political systems.

LS 1.2.4 Understands and evaluates how political systems in the United States operate.

D2.Civ.1.9-12. Distinguish the powers and responsibili­ties of local, state, tribal, na­tional, and international civic and political institutions.

GLE Component 4.2: Understands and analyzes causal factors that have shaped major events in history.

LS 4.2.1 Evaluates how individuals and movements have shaped the United States (1890—present).

LS 4.2.2 Analyzes how cultures and cultural groups have shaped the United States (1890 – present).

D2.His.1.9-12. Evaluate how historical events and devel­opments were shaped by unique circumstances of time and place as well as broader historical contexts.

D2.His.2.9-12. Analyze change and continuity in historical eras.

D2.His.3.9-12. Use ques­tions generated about indi­viduals and groups to assess how the significance of their actions changes over time and is shaped by the historical context.

GLE Component 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

LS 5.2.1 Evaluates and revises research questions to refine inquiry on an issue or event.

D1.2.9-12. Explain points of agreement and disagreement experts have about inter­pretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a com­pelling question.

D1.4.9-12. Explain how supporting questions con- tribute to an inquiry and how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.

D1.5.9-12. Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.

GLE Component 5.3: Deliberates public issues.

LS 5.3.1 Creates and articulates possible alternative resolutions to public issues and evaluates these resolutions using criteria that have been identified in the context of a discussion.

D3.1.9-12. Gather relevant information from multiple sources representing a wide range of views while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection.

GLE Component 5.4: Creates a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.

LS 5.4.1 Evaluates and interprets other points of view on an issue within a paper or presentation.

D4.1.9-12. Construct arguments using precise and knowledgeable claims, with evidence from multiple sources, while acknowledging counterclaims and evidentiary weaknesses.

D4.2.9-12. Construct expla­nations using sound reason­ing, correct sequence (linear or non-linear), examples, and details with significant and pertinent information and data, while acknowledging the strengths and weaknesses of the explanation given its purpose (e.g., cause and ef­fect, chronological, procedur­al, technical).

D4.3.9-12. Present adapta­tions of arguments and expla­nations that feature evocative ideas and perspectives on issues and topics to reach a range of audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technol­ogies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).



Lesson 11: Setting the Public Agenda introduces students to the public agenda and its importance to policy. First, students read about and discuss the public agenda and ways that citizens can influence it. Then it small groups, students are given different situations and they develop strategic plans for getting their issues or solutions to issues on the public agenda.

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level

D2.Civ.2.9-12. Analyze the role of citizens in the U.S. po­litical system, with attention to various theories of democ­racy, changes in Americans’ participation over time, and alternative models from other countries, past and present.

GLE Component 1.2: Understands the purposes, organization, and function of governments, laws, and political systems.

LS 1.2.4 Understands and evaluates how political systems in the United States operate.

D2.Civ.1.9-12. Distinguish the powers and responsibili­ties of local, state, tribal, na­tional, and international civic and political institutions.

GLE Component 4.2: Understands and analyzes causal factors that have shaped major events in history.

LS 4.2.1 Evaluates how individuals and movements have shaped the United States (1890—present).

LS 4.2.2 Analyzes how cultures and cultural groups have shaped the United States (1890 – present).

D2.His.1.9-12. Evaluate how historical events and devel­opments were shaped by unique circumstances of time and place as well as broader historical contexts.

D2.His.2.9-12. Analyze change and continuity in historical eras.

D2.His.3.9-12. Use ques­tions generated about indi­viduals and groups to assess how the significance of their actions changes over time and is shaped by the historical context.

GLE Component 5.3: Deliberates public issues.

LS 5.3.1 Creates and articulates possible alternative resolutions to public issues and evaluates these resolutions using criteria that have been identified in the context of a discussion.

D3.1.9-12. Gather relevant information from multiple sources representing a wide range of views while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection.

GLE Component 5.4: Creates a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.

LS 5.4.1 Evaluates and interprets other points of view on an issue within a paper or presentation.

D4.1.9-12. Construct arguments using precise and knowledgeable claims, with evidence from multiple sources, while acknowledging counterclaims and evidentiary weaknesses.

D4.2.9-12. Construct expla­nations using sound reason­ing, correct sequence (linear or non-linear), examples, and details with significant and pertinent information and data, while acknowledging the strengths and weaknesses of the explanation given its purpose (e.g., cause and ef­fect, chronological, procedur­al, technical).

D4.3.9-12. Present adapta­tions of arguments and expla­nations that feature evocative ideas and perspectives on issues and topics to reach a range of audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technol­ogies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).



Lesson 12: Using the Media helps students learn about the importance of the media in setting the public agenda. First, they read about and discuss how the media help set the public agenda and how citizens can influence the media and even create their own media to help change the public agenda. Then they develop a plan to do one action to use or affect the media. Finally, they begin to implement their plan. As homework, they complete their action.

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level.

D2.Civ.2.9-12. Analyze the role of citizens in the U.S. po­litical system, with attention to various theories of democ­racy, changes in Americans’ participation over time, and alternative models from other countries, past and present.

GLE Component 4.2: Understands and analyzes causal factors that have shaped major events in history.

LS 4.2.3 Analyzes and evaluates how technology and ideas have shaped U.S. history (1890—present)

D2.His.1.9-12. Evaluate how historical events and devel­opments were shaped by unique circumstances of time and place as well as broader historical contexts.

D2.His.2.9-12. Analyze change and continuity in historical eras.

D2.His.3.9-12. Use ques­tions generated about indi­viduals and groups to assess how the significance of their actions changes over time and is shaped by the historical context

GLE Component 5.4: Creates a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.

LS 5.4.1 Evaluates positions and evidence to make one’s own decisions in a paper or presentation.

D4.6.9-12. Use disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses to understand the character­istics and causes of local, re­gional, and global problems; instances of such problems in multiple contexts; and challenges and opportuni­ties faced by those trying to address these problems over time and place.

D4.7.9-12. Assess options for individual and collective action to address local, regional, and global problems by engaging in self-reflection, strategy identification, and complex causal reasoning.

D4.8.9-12. Apply a range of deliberative and democratic strategies and procedures to make decisions and take action in their classrooms, schools, and out-of-school civic contexts.

D4.3.9-12. Present adapta­tions of arguments and expla­nations that feature evocative ideas and perspectives on issues and topics to reach a range of audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technol­ogies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).



Lesson 13: Persuading Policymakers informs students that legislative and executive bodies often hold public hearing and how students can make effective presentations at these hearings. First, students read about public hearings and techniques for making presentations at these hearings. Then students role play a city council and people appearing before it attempting to persuade policymakers on hypothetical issues.

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level.

D2.Civ.2.9-12. Analyze the role of citizens in the U.S. po­litical system, with attention to various theories of democ­racy, changes in Americans’ participation over time, and alternative models from other countries, past and present.

D4.4.9-12. Critique the use of claims and evidence in arguments for credibility.

GLE Component 5.2: Uses inquiry-based research.

LS 5.2.1 Evaluates and revises research questions to refine inquiry on an issue or event.

D1.2.9-12. Explain points of agreement and disagreement experts have about inter­pretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a com­pelling question.

D1.4.9-12. Explain how supporting questions con- tribute to an inquiry and how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.

D1.5.9-12. Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.

GLE Component 5.4: Creates a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.

LS 5.4.1 Evaluates positions and evidence to make one’s own decisions in a paper or presentation.

D4.6.9-12. Use disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses to understand the character­istics and causes of local, re­gional, and global problems; instances of such problems in multiple contexts; and challenges and opportuni­ties faced by those trying to address these problems over time and place.

D4.7.9-12. Assess options for individual and collective action to address local, regional, and global problems by engaging in self-reflection, strategy identification, and complex causal reasoning.

D4.8.9-12. Apply a range of deliberative and democratic strategies and procedures to make decisions and take action in their classrooms, schools, and out-of-school civic contexts.

D4.3.9-12. Present adapta­tions of arguments and expla­nations that feature evocative ideas and perspectives on issues and topics to reach a range of audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technol­ogies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).



Lesson 14: Creating Change through the Electoral Process focuses on electoral politics and how it deeply influences policymaking. First, students read about and discuss the role that electoral politics plays in policymaking. Then in small groups, students role play campaign workers and create strategies to attract young people to participate in an election campaign.

GLE Component 1.2: Understands the purposes, organization, and function of governments, laws, and political systems.

LS 1.2.4 Understands and evaluates how political systems in the United States operate.

D2.Civ.1.9-12. Distinguish the powers and responsibili­ties of local, state, tribal, na­tional, and international civic and political institutions.

GLE Component 1.4: Understands civic involvement

LS 1.4.1 Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing local, state, and national governments and international organizations to establish or preserve individual rights and/or promote the common good.

D2.Civ.5.9-12. Evaluate cit­izens’ and institutions’ effec­tiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international level.

D2.Civ.2.9-12. Analyze the role of citizens in the U.S. po­litical system, with attention to various theories of democ­racy, changes in Americans’ participation over time, and alternative models from other countries, past and present.

GLE Component 5.4: Creates a product that uses social studies content to support a thesis and presents the product in an appropriate manner to a meaningful audience.

LS 5.4.1 Evaluates positions and evidence to make one’s own decisions in a paper or presentation.

D4.6.9-12. Use disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses to understand the character­istics and causes of local, re­gional, and global problems; instances of such problems in multiple contexts; and challenges and opportuni­ties faced by those trying to address these problems over time and place.

D4.7.9-12. Assess options for individual and collective action to address local, regional, and global problems by engaging in self-reflection, strategy identification, and complex causal reasoning.

D4.8.9-12. Apply a range of deliberative and democratic strategies and procedures to make decisions and take action in their classrooms, schools, and out-of-school civic contexts.

D4.3.9-12. Present adapta­tions of arguments and expla­nations that feature evocative ideas and perspectives on issues and topics to reach a range of audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technol­ogies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).

Last modified: Friday, 11 March 2016, 5:49 PM