Colorado Academic Standards - Social Studies

Colorado Academic Standards - Social Studies

Lesson 1: A Different Kind of Government Course introduces students to CAP. First, students learn that one of the main purposes of public education is to prepare future citizens to participate in our democracy. Then they are given an overview of CAP. Finally, they brainstorm the attributes of an effective citizen.

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.1 Students know what citizenship is.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • explaining the rights and obligations of United States citizens;
  • comparing and analyzing the rights and responsibilities of citizens and non-citizens in the United States; and
  • evaluating the usefulness of the following characteristics of an effective citizen to participate effectively in public life (for example, civic virtue, common courtesy, respect for person and property, civic and personal responsibility, and honest and fair dealings).

Colorado Standards
Lesson 2: Introduction to Public Policy
introducesLesson 2: The Connection of Policy and ProblemsOverview the link between policy and problems. First, students read and discuss a short article defining policy. Then they discuss policy and its connection to problems. Next, in small groups, they do a newspaper search to find examples of public policy.

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.1 Students know how the organization and functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • analyzing how the organization of the local, state, and national governments influences the formulation and implementation of policy (for example, weak versus strong mayoral system, unicameral versus bicameral legislature, legislative approval of presidential appointments);
  • evaluating the tension between citizens' desire for government services and benefits, and the costs associated with providing those;

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform); and

developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).



Colorado Standards
Lesson 3: Problems, Policy, and Civic Actions
gives students further background in problems, policy, and civic action to prepare them for CAP. First, students analyze problems in terms of causes and effects. Next, they explore how policy can be linked to problems. Finally, they list possible civic actions that can be taken to when working on a problem.

Standard 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.1 Students know how the organization and functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • analyzing how the organization of the local, state, and national governments influences the formulation and implementation of policy (for example, weak versus strong mayoral system, unicameral versus bicameral legislature, legislative approval of presidential appointments);
  • evaluating the tension between citizens' desire for government services and benefits, and the costs associated with providing those;

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform); and
  • developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.1 Students know what citizenship is.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes explaining the rights and obligations of United States citizens;

  • comparing and analyzing the rights and responsibilities of citizens and non-citizens in the United States; and
  • evaluating the usefulness of the following characteristics of an effective citizen to participate effectively in public life (for example, civic virtue, common courtesy, respect for person and property, civic and personal responsibility, and honest and fair dealings).

4.4 Students know how citizens can participate in civic life.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of political participation (for example, voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials);
  • describing various ways one can exercise leadership and participate in public affairs (for example, campaigning);
  • demonstrating understanding of strategies for monitoring and influencing current public policy (for example, writing to a public official, writing letters to the editor, working with advocacy groups, working on a political campaign or using technology to monitor and influence legislation);

Colorado Standards
Lesson 4: Introducing Policy Analysis
helps students develop a deeper understanding of public policy and the interaction between government and citizens in making policy. They look at case studies and are introduced to policy analysis.

STANDARD 1: Students understand the purposes of government, and the basic constitutional principles of the United States republican form of government.

1.1 Students know and understand what government is and what purpose it serves.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • explaining how purposes of government impact the individual and society;
  • analyzing how different forms of government execute the purposes of government; and
  • analyzing and knowing how different forms of government impact the individual (for example, personal freedom and political liberty).

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.1 Students know how the organization and functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • analyzing how the organization of the local, state, and national governments influences the formulation and implementation of policy (for example, weak versus strong mayoral system, unicameral versus bicameral legislature, legislative approval of presidential appointments);
  • evaluating the tension between citizens' desire for government services and benefits, and the costs associated with providing those;

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform);

Colorado Standards
Lesson 5: Policymaking in the Three Branches of Government
introduces students to executive, legislative, and judicial policymaking and to policy evaluation. First, students discuss how policy can be made by each of the branches. Then they read about and discuss how the Chicago City Council passed an ordinance to suppress gang activity and how each branch of government was involved in the policy. Finally, students are introduced to a policy-analysis rubric (GRADE) and apply it to the Chicago gang ordinance.

STANDARD 1: Students understand the purposes of government, and the basic constitutional principles of the United States republican form of government.

1.1 Students know and understand what government is and what purpose it serves.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • explaining how purposes of government impact the individual and society;
  • analyzing how different forms of government execute the purposes of government; and
  • analyzing and knowing how different forms of government impact the individual (for example, personal freedom and political liberty).

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.1 Students know how the organization and functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • analyzing how the organization of the local, state, and national governments influences the formulation and implementation of policy (for example, weak versus strong mayoral system, unicameral versus bicameral legislature, legislative approval of presidential appointments);
  • evaluating the tension between citizens' desire for government services and benefits, and the costs associated with providing those;

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform); and
  • developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).

Colorado Standards
Lesson 6: Analyzing Anti-Gang Policies
provides students with practice in analyzing policy. First, as a whole group, they evaluate an anti-gang policy using GRADE. Then in small groups, they are given policies that address gang violence and they evaluate each.

STANDARD 1: Students understand the purposes of government, and the basic constitutional principles of the United States republican form of government.

1.1 Students know and understand what government is and what purpose it serves.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • explaining how purposes of government impact the individual and society;

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.1 Students know how the organization and functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • analyzing how the organization of the local, state, and national governments influences the formulation and implementation of policy (for example, weak versus strong mayoral system, unicameral versus bicameral legislature, legislative approval of presidential appointments);
  • evaluating the tension between citizens' desire for government services and benefits, and the costs associated with providing those;

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform); and
  • developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).

Colorado Standards
Lesson 7: Policymaking at the Local Level
gets students to examine an instance of policymaking at a school board, one of the most common institutions at the local level. First, students read about and discuss a common local (and national) problem, the dropout rate. Then they role play subcommittees of a hypothetical school board, examine documents about the dropout problem, and craft a policy to address the dropout problem. Finally, they exchange policies with other groups and evaluate one another’s policies using the GRADE rubric.

STANDARD 1: Students understand the purposes of government, and the basic constitutional principles of the United States republican form of government.

1.1 Students know and understand what government is and what purpose it serves.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • explaining how purposes of government impact the individual and society;
  • analyzing how different forms of government execute the purposes of government; and
  • analyzing and knowing how different forms of government impact the individual (for example, personal freedom and political liberty).

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.1 Students know how the organization and functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • analyzing how the organization of the local, state, and national governments influences the formulation and implementation of policy (for example, weak versus strong mayoral system, unicameral versus bicameral legislature, legislative approval of presidential appointments);
  • evaluating the tension between citizens' desire for government services and benefits, and the costs associated with providing those;

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform); and
  • developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).

Colorado Standards
Lesson 8: Law & Policy
informs students about how existing law can influence public policy and policymaking. First, students read about and discuss how existing law can influence public policy. Then in small groups, they role play members of a public policy law firm and decide whether a policy of evicting renters violates existing law and whether a new law is needed to protect renters.

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.1 Students know how the organization and functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • analyzing how the organization of the local, state, and national governments influences the formulation and implementation of policy (for example, weak versus strong mayoral system, unicameral versus bicameral legislature, legislative approval of presidential appointments);
  • evaluating the tension between citizens' desire for government services and benefits, and the costs associated with providing those;

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform); and

developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.4 Students know how citizens can participate in civic life.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of political participation (for example, voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials);
  • describing various ways one can exercise leadership and participate in public affairs (for example, campaigning);
  • demonstrating understanding of strategies for monitoring and influencing current public policy (for example, writing to a public official, writing letters to the editor, working with advocacy groups, working on a political campaign or using technology to monitor and influence legislation)

Colorado Standards
Lesson 9: Persuading
introduces students to the art of persuasion. First, they read about and discuss the three types of persuasion: logos, ethos, and pathos. Then students prepare two-minute persuasive talks on why the issue that they have chosen to address in CAP is important. Finally, in pairs, students present and critique one another’s talks.

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.4 Students know how citizens can participate in civic life.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of political participation (for example, voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials);
  • describing various ways one can exercise leadership and participate in public affairs (for example, campaigning);
  • demonstrating understanding of strategies for monitoring and influencing current public policy (for example, writing to a public official, writing letters to the editor, working with advocacy groups, working on a political campaign or using technology to monitor and influence legislation)

Colorado Standards
Lesson 10: Building Constituencies
introduces students to the importance of building a constituency to support or oppose public policies. First, students read and discuss about how a historically significant movement gained support in the community. Then in small groups, students brainstorm how they can get support for their CAP issue.

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.1 Students know how the organization and functions of local, state, and national governments.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • analyzing how the organization of the local, state, and national governments influences the formulation and implementation of policy (for example, weak versus strong mayoral system, unicameral versus bicameral legislature, legislative approval of presidential appointments);
  • evaluating the tension between citizens' desire for government services and benefits, and the costs associated with providing those;

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform); and
  • developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.3 Students know how citizens can exercise their rights.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • identifying the scope and limits of rights (for example, all rights have limits);
  • explaining considerations and criteria commonly used in determining what limits should be placed on specific rights (for example, clear and present danger, national security, public safety);
  • evaluating different positions on contemporary issues that involve rights of citizens (for example, restricted membership in organizations, sexual harassment, school prayer, refusal of medical care); and
  • describing and evaluating historical or current examples of citizen movements to ensure rights of all citizens.

4.4 Students know how citizens can participate in civic life.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of political participation (for example, voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials);
  • describing various ways one can exercise leadership and participate in public affairs (for example, campaigning);
  • demonstrating understanding of strategies for monitoring and influencing current public policy (for example, writing to a public official, writing letters to the editor, working with advocacy groups, working on a political campaign or using technology to monitor and influence legislation); and
  • describing the role of civil disobedience.

Colorado Standards
Lesson 11: Setting the Public Agenda
introduces students to the public agenda and its importance to policy. First, students read about and discuss the public agenda and ways that citizens can influence it. Then in small groups, students are given different situations and they develop strategic plans for getting their issues or solutions to issues on the public agenda.

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform);

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.4 Students know how citizens can participate in civic life.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • valuating the effectiveness of various forms of political participation (for example, voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials);
  • describing various ways one can exercise leadership and participate in public affairs (for example, campaigning);
  • demonstrating understanding of strategies for monitoring and influencing current public policy (for example, writing to a public official, writing letters to the editor, working with advocacy groups, working on a political campaign or using technology to monitor and influence legislation)

Colorado Standards
Lesson 12: Using the Media
helps students learn about the importance of the media in setting the public agenda. First, they read about and discuss how the media help set the public agenda and how citizens can influence the media and even create their own media to help change the public agenda. Then they develop a plan do one action to use or affect the media. Finally, they will begin to implement their plan. As homework, they will complete their action.

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform); and
  • developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.4 Students know how citizens can participate in civic life.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of political participation (for example, voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials);
  • describing various ways one can exercise leadership and participate in public affairs (for example, campaigning);
  • demonstrating understanding of strategies for monitoring and influencing current public policy (for example, writing to a public official, writing letters to the editor, working with advocacy groups, working on a political campaign or using technology to monitor and influence legislation)

Colorado Standards
Lesson 13: Persuading Policy Makers
informs students that legislative and executive bodies often hold public hearing and how students can make effective presentations at these hearings. First, students read about public hearings and techniques for making presentations at these hearings. Then students role play a city council and people appearing before it attempting to persuade policy makers on hypothetical issues.

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • explaining why conflicts within traditional principles of representative government may make agreement on issues of public policy difficult (for example, affirmative action, gun control, environmental protection, capital punishment, growth, welfare reform);

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.4 Students know how citizens can participate in civic life.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of political participation (for example, voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials);
  • describing various ways one can exercise leadership and participate in public affairs (for example, campaigning);
  • demonstrating understanding of strategies for monitoring and influencing current public policy (for example, writing to a public official, writing letters to the editor, working with advocacy groups, working on a political campaign or using technology to monitor and influence legislation)

Colorado Standards
Lesson 14: Creating Change Through the Electoral Process
focuses on electoral politics and how it deeply influences policy making. First, students read about and discuss the role that electoral politics plays in policy making. Then in small groups, students role play campaign workers and create strategies to attract young people to participate in an election campaign.

STANDARD 2: Students know the structure and function of local, state, and national government and how citizen involvement shapes public policy.

2.4 Students know how public policy is developed at the local, state, and national levels.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the contemporary roles of voters, political parties, associations, and groups in local, state, and national politics (for example, political action committees, interest groups, think tanks, unions, professional organizations);
  • analyzing a current public policy issue at local, state, or national levels and evaluating the alternative positions (for example, welfare reform);
  • developing, evaluating, and defending positions about the role of media and public opinion in United States politics (for example, ways that government and media influence public opinion and the behavior of public officials).

STANDARD 4: Students understand how citizens exercise the roles, rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life at all levels - local, state, and national.

4.1 Students know what citizenship is.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

explaining the rights and obligations of United States citizens;

4.4 Students know how citizens can participate in civic life.

Grades 9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes

  • evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of political participation (for example, voting, attending political and governmental meetings, contacting public officials);
  • describing various ways one can exercise leadership and participate in public affairs (for example, campaigning);
  • demonstrating understanding of strategies for monitoring and influencing current public policy (for example, writing to a public official, writing letters to the editor, working with advocacy groups, working on a political campaign or using technology to monitor and influence legislation); and
Last modified: Monday, 29 June 2015, 2:31 PM